Another City. Another Live Session. This time we took it back with one of our favorite Beatles songs. 

#ComeTogether

7 More Lessons Learned As A Traveling DIY Band1.)  Make Your Intentions Crystal Clear – You don’t have to be rude to make sure people understand your thoughts. Be clear, be articulate, and be deliberate. For example, I booked a place to stay in Manchester for our last week in the UK. I chose this particular spot because of its quality accommodations (Wi-Fi, kitchen, washing machine, etc) and relative proximity to city centre. When I sent the request I was informed that Wi-Fi had yet to be set up, but that it would most likely be ready by the time we arrived. I said that Wi-Fi was important but if it would be ready by the time we arrived it should not be an issue. I was given no full guarantee but assured that it was “most likely” going to be ready so I went ahead and booked. But….Sure enough when we arrived Wi-Fi was indeed not set up. Now before I go on, let’s be clear: We don’t need Wi-Fi just so we can check Facebook or Viber. We need it because that is how we navigate, keep up with our budget, plan our day/week, and so on.  In hindsight (even though the advertisement clearly stated that Wi-Fi was part of the deal), I should have been very clear that we needed Wi-Fi and should have considered booking somewhere else instead of making an expensive mistake such as this.


2.)  The Power Of Busking – Busking is a great way to make some extra cash, meet new people, and practice your chops. It’s not always lucrative. Sometimes you may walk away with only £20 ($32) after four hours, and other times you may walk away with £100 ($160) for and hour and a half. It’s a risky game, and we’ve seen both sides of it. Overall we have personally experienced that you can find yourself booking a gig, making several new fans, or even turning a random stranger’s day around for the better. 


3.)  Know Your Budget – Every week we sit down and review our budget: What we’ve spent the previous week, what we can afford to spend for the next, and how we can and cannot cut back. The truth is, you will make a mistake and overspend (as mentioned in #1) on occasion. It’s going to happen. You have to suck it up, and just commit yourself to doing better the next time. There will be times that you have to turn down a potential gig opportunity because your account just won’t allow for it. The trick is to make sure that if this is the case, you make up for it by doing something productive (see #2). On the opposite spectrum you will find times where your budget allows for some wiggle room. In cases such as this, you can choose whether or not to splurge a bit. Just remember to carefully consider the consequences of doing so.


4.)  Work Out Your Issues – Being on the road isn’t always glamorous (honestly it never really is, but you take what you can get). One of the ugliest of ugly truths is that at some point you will argue with your companions. It can be as much as feeling like you’ve been disrespected, or it can be as simple as someone’s stanky feet. The important part is that you voice it. No matter how trivial it may seem, that stuff builds up. If you don’t let it out in short but productive bursts, you will explode and it will be much worse when that happens. So let your feelings be known, talk about how to fix it, and be done with it.  *Before you leave your home town, make sure you all agree to be open with each other*


5.)  Listen To Your Body – There’s a good chance that regardless of how well you eat, how much exercise you partake in, and how many hours of sleep you get, you will get sick. We’ve experienced food poisoning and bad colds while we’ve been here in the UK and we’d like to think we’ve been taking pretty good care of ourselves. When something doesn’t feel right, pay attention. If your throat is soar, eat a teaspoon of honey every hour or so and drink hot herbal teas. If your GI tract isn’t stayin’ wit’ it, go light on the cheese and butter and stick to simpler things like bland rice and chicken. Drink plenty of water and get plenty of rest. Having a minor cold is not a good excuse to miss a show, so rest your voice or take a nap but be ready to kill it when the time comes. However if your body is really struggling, listen to it. Take a break or if needed, see a doctor.

6.)  Save Some Time For Yourself – Even the most out-going of extraverts need some personal space. While there often isn’t much room for getting in some “Me-Time” it is vital for your health. Constantly being together will eventually create a mental and olfactory “FUNK” that even George Clinton and Sly Stone would decline to take part in. So go for a walk, write in a journal, or read a book. Whatever you do, get some space and fresh air!


7.)  Learn How To Cook – Seriously. Learn how to make several basic meals (quesadillas, chicken and rice, scrambled eggs with home fries), and learn how to make a few nicer meals (chicken picatta, fajita tacos, shepherd’s pie). You will save a lot of money by staying in places with kitchens and by buying groceries. It’s true that both of us love to cook and experiment in the kitchen. But you don’t have to feel the same way to appreciate how it can positively affect your budget. A great resource (and our personal favorite) is Airbnb.com. Not only is it cheaper than a hotel relative to the areas you’re in, but you can filter your searches to suit your needs (washer/dryer, wifi, kitchen, toiletries, etc). And since you can find a place with a kitchen, you can cook. And if you can cook, you will save money. BAM.
*we will post some of our recipes and cooking tips in the near future*
Cheers Turn Up,

- Dustin

7 More Lessons Learned As A Traveling DIY Band

1.)  
Make Your Intentions Crystal Clear – You don’t have to be rude to make sure people understand your thoughts. Be clear, be articulate, and be deliberate. For example, I booked a place to stay in Manchester for our last week in the UK. I chose this particular spot because of its quality accommodations (Wi-Fi, kitchen, washing machine, etc) and relative proximity to city centre. When I sent the request I was informed that Wi-Fi had yet to be set up, but that it would most likely be ready by the time we arrived. I said that Wi-Fi was important but if it would be ready by the time we arrived it should not be an issue. I was given no full guarantee but assured that it was “most likely” going to be ready so I went ahead and booked. But….Sure enough when we arrived Wi-Fi was indeed not set up. Now before I go on, let’s be clear: We don’t need Wi-Fi just so we can check Facebook or Viber. We need it because that is how we navigate, keep up with our budget, plan our day/week, and so on.  In hindsight (even though the advertisement clearly stated that Wi-Fi was part of the deal), I should have been very clear that we needed Wi-Fi and should have considered booking somewhere else instead of making an expensive mistake such as this.

2.)  The Power Of Busking – Busking is a great way to make some extra cash, meet new people, and practice your chops. It’s not always lucrative. Sometimes you may walk away with only £20 ($32) after four hours, and other times you may walk away with £100 ($160) for and hour and a half. It’s a risky game, and we’ve seen both sides of it. Overall we have personally experienced that you can find yourself booking a gig, making several new fans, or even turning a random stranger’s day around for the better. 

3.)  Know Your Budget – Every week we sit down and review our budget: What we’ve spent the previous week, what we can afford to spend for the next, and how we can and cannot cut back. The truth is, you will make a mistake and overspend (as mentioned in #1) on occasion. It’s going to happen. You have to suck it up, and just commit yourself to doing better the next time. There will be times that you have to turn down a potential gig opportunity because your account just won’t allow for it. The trick is to make sure that if this is the case, you make up for it by doing something productive (see #2). On the opposite spectrum you will find times where your budget allows for some wiggle room. In cases such as this, you can choose whether or not to splurge a bit. Just remember to carefully consider the consequences of doing so.

4.)  Work Out Your Issues – Being on the road isn’t always glamorous (honestly it never really is, but you take what you can get). One of the ugliest of ugly truths is that at some point you will argue with your companions. It can be as much as feeling like you’ve been disrespected, or it can be as simple as someone’s stanky feet. The important part is that you voice it. No matter how trivial it may seem, that stuff builds up. If you don’t let it out in short but productive bursts, you will explode and it will be much worse when that happens. So let your feelings be known, talk about how to fix it, and be done with it.  *Before you leave your home town, make sure you all agree to be open with each other*

5.)  Listen To Your Body – There’s a good chance that regardless of how well you eat, how much exercise you partake in, and how many hours of sleep you get, you will get sick. We’ve experienced food poisoning and bad colds while we’ve been here in the UK and we’d like to think we’ve been taking pretty good care of ourselves. When something doesn’t feel right, pay attention. If your throat is soar, eat a teaspoon of honey every hour or so and drink hot herbal teas. If your GI tract isn’t stayin’ wit’ it, go light on the cheese and butter and stick to simpler things like bland rice and chicken. Drink plenty of water and get plenty of rest. Having a minor cold is not a good excuse to miss a show, so rest your voice or take a nap but be ready to kill it when the time comes. However if your body is really struggling, listen to it. Take a break or if needed, see a doctor.

6.)  Save Some Time For Yourself – Even the most out-going of extraverts need some personal space. While there often isn’t much room for getting in some “Me-Time” it is vital for your health. Constantly being together will eventually create a mental and olfactory “FUNK” that even George Clinton and Sly Stone would decline to take part in. So go for a walk, write in a journal, or read a book. Whatever you do, get some space and fresh air!

7.)  Learn How To Cook – Seriously. Learn how to make several basic meals (quesadillas, chicken and rice, scrambled eggs with home fries), and learn how to make a few nicer meals (chicken picatta, fajita tacos, shepherd’s pie). You will save a lot of money by staying in places with kitchens and by buying groceries. It’s true that both of us love to cook and experiment in the kitchen. But you don’t have to feel the same way to appreciate how it can positively affect your budget. A great resource (and our personal favorite) is Airbnb.com. Not only is it cheaper than a hotel relative to the areas you’re in, but you can filter your searches to suit your needs (washer/dryer, wifi, kitchen, toiletries, etc). And since you can find a place with a kitchen, you can cook. And if you can cook, you will save money. BAM.

*we will post some of our recipes and cooking tips in the near future*

Cheers Turn Up,

- Dustin

We are playing Pangaea Music Festival at Manchester University.The largest student run music festival here in England. See you folks Saturday, September 20th. 

We are playing Pangaea Music Festival at Manchester University.The largest student run music festival here in England. See you folks Saturday, September 20th. 

Of the many places we’ve visited during our travels in England, one of the most interesting and educational has been the city of York. York is one of the oldest places in England, founded by the Romans in 71 AD. Later becoming the capital of the Roman province of Britannia Inferior. In the Middle Ages, York grew as a major wool trading center and became the capital of the northern ecclesiastical province of the Church of England, a role it has retained. Its primary tourist destination is the York Minster, the above-pictured cathedral.
 
Flash-forward to summer 2014, and you will find The Silver Comet walking through, and performing on, the streets of York. Word on the cobblestone walkways is that a few months before we arrived, the city council lifted their license requirements for busking, following an example set by the city of Leeds (one of our new favorite places). It’s now fair game to tote around a guitar, a microphone, a battery powered amp, and even a drum set and play just about anywhere in the city (within reason). So we decided to give it a shot, and this is what we learned: 
 
- It’s competitive and if you want to get a good spot you’ve gotta be an early bird: We had a run-in with a piano busker who gave us a stern word for busking too close to his pitch. We waited for him to finish then started back up. 
 
- English is a confusing language: We met some people from Cyprus who were a bit lost. For full effect, here’s our conversation:
 
Cyprus: “Hello, are you going to sing?”
 
Parry and Dustin: “Yes, we are just waiting for the piano guy over there to finish.”
 
C: “Oooh ok..where are you from?”
 
P&D: “Atlanta, GA, United States.”
 
C: “Oh cool, the hip hop place!”
 
P&D: “Yeah pretty much.”
 
C: “Cooool..so anyway, could you tell us where the big street with all the lights is?”
 
P&D: “Uuhh we’re not from here but that doesn’t sound familiar. York is a small town and we haven’t seen any lights.”
 
C: “Oh but we thought New York is a big place!”
 
P&D: “Umm..you mean York, right? Where we are now? It’s not a big city.”
 
C: “No, no it’s New York. With all the lights. The street with all the lights.”
 
P&D: “You mean…Times Square?”
 
C: “Yes yes! New York!”
 
P&D: “Like, the Statue of Liberty and the Empire State Building?”
 
C: “Yes, all that!”
 
P&D: “Yeah…um but this is York.”
 
C: “Yes, New York.”
 
P&D: “No. York. In England. New York is in the United States.”
 
C: “But you speak English and they speak English in the Unites States.”
 
P&D: “Yes?…”
 
C: “So it’s the same.”
 
P&D: “No. New York is thousands of miles away. Totally different country.”
 
C: “But when we got our rental car they told us New York was here.” 
 
P&D: “No. It’s not. You have to get a plane there.”
 
C: “Oh…so maybe when you are done playing we all take a bus to New York, yes?”
 
P&D: “No…you can’t take a bus. You need a plane or a boat. And it’s thousands of miles and many hours away.” 
 
C: “Oh…ok. Well you play music now, yes?”
 
P&D: “Yeah it’s time now.” 
 
Everyone makes mistakes…Moving on Now.
 
- You can make someone’s day with the right song: In our second busking pitch later that day a guy came up to us after we played Foo Fighters “Hero” and said that he had a really bad day, but hearing us play that song made everything ok again. 
 
- It’s a full time job: On more than one occasion we’ve had people tell
us that busking is how they pay the bills. It’s their 9-5. It can be hard work and it’s a financially risky career. But to them it’s worth it because they get to do what they love every day and they get paid to do it!
 
- Though it’s competitive, there is a strong community among the buskers: The next time we went to York, we met a band (King No-One) that was planning to set up in the spot that we had grabbed. So we agreed to switch off every 45 minutes. This is evidently a common thing. Buskers will find a good spot with high traffic, then share it with another busker so they both have a fair shot. 
 
York and Leeds have set examples for the way other cities should treat their local artists. It seems that a majority of the locals enjoy good buskers and feel that it adds life and energy to the city. Fortunately these city governments took the time to listen to their citizens and make a change that has thus far proven to be positive. 
 
This lesson can be learned in places more local to our home. We have done our fair share of busking back in Atlanta. Generally we’ve found that the local citizens appreciate and support it (Parry once made $30 by himself singing a Capella in Piedmont Park). However, the city government has yet to recognize this since busking is still classified as panhandling under Atlanta law. In fact last year two different people in Atlanta were arrested (that’s right, ARRESTED) for busking. Hopefully in time and with enough vocal support, this will change because now that we’ve gotten a taste for the positive effects of busking, we want to bring it home with us. 
 
That’s all for now, 
Cheers Turn Up!
 
- Dustin
 
 
 

 

Of the many places we’ve visited during our travels in England, one of the most interesting and educational has been the city of York. York is one of the oldest places in England, founded by the Romans in 71 AD. Later becoming the capital of the Roman province of Britannia Inferior. In the Middle Ages, York grew as a major wool trading center and became the capital of the northern ecclesiastical province of the Church of England, a role it has retained. Its primary tourist destination is the York Minster, the above-pictured cathedral.

 

Flash-forward to summer 2014, and you will find The Silver Comet walking through, and performing on, the streets of York. Word on the cobblestone walkways is that a few months before we arrived, the city council lifted their license requirements for busking, following an example set by the city of Leeds (one of our new favorite places). It’s now fair game to tote around a guitar, a microphone, a battery powered amp, and even a drum set and play just about anywhere in the city (within reason). So we decided to give it a shot, and this is what we learned:

 

- It’s competitive and if you want to get a good spot you’ve gotta be an early bird: We had a run-in with a piano busker who gave us a stern word for busking too close to his pitch. We waited for him to finish then started back up.

 

- English is a confusing language: We met some people from Cyprus who were a bit lost. For full effect, here’s our conversation:

 

Cyprus: “Hello, are you going to sing?”

 

Parry and Dustin: “Yes, we are just waiting for the piano guy over there to finish.”

 

C: “Oooh ok..where are you from?”

 

P&D: “Atlanta, GA, United States.”

 

C: “Oh cool, the hip hop place!”

 

P&D: “Yeah pretty much.”

 

C: “Cooool..so anyway, could you tell us where the big street with all the lights is?”

 

P&D: “Uuhh we’re not from here but that doesn’t sound familiar. York is a small town and we haven’t seen any lights.”

 

C: “Oh but we thought New York is a big place!”

 

P&D: “Umm..you mean York, right? Where we are now? It’s not a big city.”

 

C: “No, no it’s New York. With all the lights. The street with all the lights.”

 

P&D: “You mean…Times Square?”

 

C: “Yes yes! New York!”

 

P&D: “Like, the Statue of Liberty and the Empire State Building?”

 

C: “Yes, all that!”

 

P&D: “Yeah…um but this is York.”

 

C: “Yes, New York.”

 

P&D: “No. York. In England. New York is in the United States.”

 

C: “But you speak English and they speak English in the Unites States.”

 

P&D: “Yes?…”

 

C: “So it’s the same.”

 

P&D: “No. New York is thousands of miles away. Totally different country.”

 

C: “But when we got our rental car they told us New York was here.”

 

P&D: “No. It’s not. You have to get a plane there.”

 

C: “Oh…so maybe when you are done playing we all take a bus to New York, yes?”

 

P&D: “No…you can’t take a bus. You need a plane or a boat. And it’s thousands of miles and many hours away.”

 

C: “Oh…ok. Well you play music now, yes?”

 

P&D: “Yeah it’s time now.”

 

Everyone makes mistakes…Moving on Now.

 

- You can make someone’s day with the right song: In our second busking pitch later that day a guy came up to us after we played Foo Fighters “Hero” and said that he had a really bad day, but hearing us play that song made everything ok again.

 

- It’s a full time job: On more than one occasion we’ve had people tell

us that busking is how they pay the bills. It’s their 9-5. It can be hard work and it’s a financially risky career. But to them it’s worth it because they get to do what they love every day and they get paid to do it!

 

- Though it’s competitive, there is a strong community among the buskers: The next time we went to York, we met a band (King No-One) that was planning to set up in the spot that we had grabbed. So we agreed to switch off every 45 minutes. This is evidently a common thing. Buskers will find a good spot with high traffic, then share it with another busker so they both have a fair shot.

 

York and Leeds have set examples for the way other cities should treat their local artists. It seems that a majority of the locals enjoy good buskers and feel that it adds life and energy to the city. Fortunately these city governments took the time to listen to their citizens and make a change that has thus far proven to be positive.

 

This lesson can be learned in places more local to our home. We have done our fair share of busking back in Atlanta. Generally we’ve found that the local citizens appreciate and support it (Parry once made $30 by himself singing a Capella in Piedmont Park). However, the city government has yet to recognize this since busking is still classified as panhandling under Atlanta law. In fact last year two different people in Atlanta were arrested (that’s right, ARRESTED) for busking. Hopefully in time and with enough vocal support, this will change because now that we’ve gotten a taste for the positive effects of busking, we want to bring it home with us.

 

That’s all for now,

Cheers Turn Up!

 

- Dustin

 

 

 

 

What a DIY Artist can learn from Beyoncé’s VMA performance:If you haven’t had a chance to watch it, you should treat yourself for 15 mins.  I wouldn’t mislead you. Last night at the VMA’s Beyoncé shook the world when she performed a complete (almost) medley of her self titled album, which she dropped out of the blue (Ivy) last December. The medley included 12 tracks and a ton of camera close ups of the other two-thirds of the Carter entity (Strategic?)There are quite a few things that can be digested as a fellow musician, but here are a few things every DIY artist can learn from Beyoncé’s VMA concert:1) Step Yo Game Up!If Beyoncé’s performance doesn’t inspire artists (myself included) to consciously raise their caliber of entertainment value, then I’m not sure what will at this point. From the choreography to the visual effects, you could tell we were witnessing an Icon doing what they do best; with care and attention to detail on every aspect of the set (dare I say MJ level?). Beyoncé cleverly picked her moments to belt her heart out and then demonstrate vocal restraint by releasing pure emotion and energy through just dance alone. (Hashtag Flawless)2) Make them want the whole albumHow rare is it that you witness an artist in today’s era of music perform a 15 min+ set on an awards show? Definitely a well deserved and hard working one, such as Beyoncé. That said, it was incredibly brilliant for her to perform the tracks from her surprise album released back in December. This move once again reminds the world that the ‘unplanned’ release wasn’t an accidental success, but all part of the long term plan to gain interest in the project. She could have easily done a repeat of last year’s Super Bowl performance by shelling out hit after hit of her past, but she instead provided a spectacle of a full body of work (Beyoncé) for those late to the party. What a bold and impactful move to make in such a single driven society. This plan is a sure fire way to make the masses want the whole thing and excite them to listen to a complete project versus picking instant favorites and moving on to the next great big thing. Should we expect major boosts in album sales in the upcoming weeks? I would like to think so. 3) Speak with actions first
With Beyoncé, image is everything. Over the run of her career it’s clear she steers clear of controversy and negative media. However, most recently the Carters have been under a bit of heat following ‘that’ incident. (google: elevator) Even with all the viral memes and vines spreading around, you didn’t hear a word from the mouth of Beyoncé until the ‘Flawless (Remix)’ which was no question performed in her VMA set. She chose a grand platform to deaden any doubt about the state of the Carter family. From Baby Blue’s appearance and Jay’s stage side support one could conclude that if anything had gone wrong it was a thing of the past. This is a perfect example of choosing actions over words to send a message. Use it how you will. -Parry#RockandSoul

What a DIY Artist can learn from Beyoncé’s VMA performance:

If you haven’t had a chance to watch it, you should treat yourself for 15 mins.  I wouldn’t mislead you. 

Last night at the VMA’s Beyoncé shook the world when she performed a complete (almost) medley of her self titled album, which she dropped out of the blue (Ivy) last December. The medley included 12 tracks and a ton of camera close ups of the other two-thirds of the Carter entity (Strategic?)

There are quite a few things that can be digested as a fellow musician, but here are a few things every DIY artist can learn from Beyoncé’s VMA concert:

1) Step Yo Game Up!

If Beyoncé’s performance doesn’t inspire artists (myself included) to consciously raise their caliber of entertainment value, then I’m not sure what will at this point. From the choreography to the visual effects, you could tell we were witnessing an Icon doing what they do best; with care and attention to detail on every aspect of the set (dare I say MJ level?). Beyoncé cleverly picked her moments to belt her heart out and then demonstrate vocal restraint by releasing pure emotion and energy through just dance alone. (Hashtag Flawless)

2) Make them want the whole album

How rare is it that you witness an artist in today’s era of music perform a 15 min+ set on an awards show? Definitely a well deserved and hard working one, such as Beyoncé. That said, it was incredibly brilliant for her to perform the tracks from her surprise album released back in December. This move once again reminds the world that the ‘unplanned’ release wasn’t an accidental success, but all part of the long term plan to gain interest in the project. She could have easily done a repeat of last year’s Super Bowl performance by shelling out hit after hit of her past, but she instead provided a spectacle of a full body of work (Beyoncé) for those late to the party. What a bold and impactful move to make in such a single driven society. This plan is a sure fire way to make the masses want the whole thing and excite them to listen to a complete project versus picking instant favorites and moving on to the next great big thing.

Should we expect major boosts in album sales in the upcoming weeks? I would like to think so. 

3) Speak with actions first

With Beyoncé, image is everything. Over the run of her career it’s clear she steers clear of controversy and negative media. However, most recently the Carters have been under a bit of heat following ‘that’ incident. (google: elevator) Even with all the viral memes and vines spreading around, you didn’t hear a word from the mouth of Beyoncé until the ‘Flawless (Remix)’ which was no question performed in her VMA set. She chose a grand platform to deaden any doubt about the state of the Carter family. From Baby Blue’s appearance and Jay’s stage side support one could conclude that if anything had gone wrong it was a thing of the past. 

This is a perfect example of choosing actions over words to send a message. Use it how you will. 


-Parry
#RockandSoul





Paris Live Session— New Flame (Chris Brown)


Who Eats Best? America vs France vs United Kingdom:
 
Food. We love it almost as much as we love music (sometimes even more). We love to cook and we love to eat. Whether trying new dishes and restaurants, or sticking to the classics that we know we enjoy, we will almost never turn down the opportunity to get on some grubbin’. With that said, we have compiled a short list of the similarities and differences between English, French, and American cuisine.  

*For an added treat, we have also put together a small catalogue of some of the best places to chow down in the cities that we’ve visited*

Many ingredients that Americans have grown to expect to find in their food (like hydrogenated oils, high fructose corn syrup, MSG, etc.) simply aren’t legal in the United Kingdom, France, and many other European nations. Instead they use natural or organic ingredients.  
American food manufacturers tend to put a lot of sugar in everything! Salad dressing, condiments, vitamins, and even bread! In Europe, sugar only goes into things that are meant to be sweet.
Most everyone that makes fries serves the thick cut variation and occasionally curly fries. In the states we have both of the above in addition to shoe string fries, waffle fries, home fries, thin-sliced fries, and standard fries. Fun fact: In the UK, french fries are called chips, and potato chips are called crisps
The British seem to be a little skimpy on their seasonings in restaurant dishes. They simply don’t add as much salt, pepper, or anything else for that matter.
English breakfast => Two fried eggs, toast, baked beans, bacon, sausage, whole sautéed mushrooms, and sliced sautéed tomatoes, served with tea or a latte; American breakfast => Scrambled eggs with cheese, hashbrowns, bacon, pancakes, buttered toast, served with coffee or orange juice; French breakfast => A croissant and espresso.
Speaking of bacon…American bacon is all pork belly and tends to be fattier than British bacon, which is the perfect blend of pork loin and pork belly.
British and French milk doesn’t need to be refrigerated until after being opened. Same with their eggs.
British and French varieties of butter and cheese are more creamy and flavorful than their American counterparts.
Americans have McDonalds, Burger King, White Castle, Chick Fil A, Wendy’s, etc…The British and French have Kebob shops and fried chicken joints. THEY. ARE. EVERYWHERE.
Try and find an American that doesn’t lather up their food in some kind of sauce. It’s in our nature. Turns out to be the same for the British. They just like different sauces. Brits love gravy, brown sauce (sort of like steak sauce, but not very good…), and Peri Peri sauce (credited to Portuguese explorers and made using the Bird’s Eye Chili which is native to South Africa). We love ranch and hot sauce. We both love ketchup, mayo, and mustard, though English mustard tends to have an after-burn reminiscent of horseradish or wasabi.
Portion size…Americans just eat too much food. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but it’s the truth. On the upside, we’ve all lost some weight!
America takes the gold in food variety and overall restaurant satisfaction. France (at least Paris) follows closely with silver, and England…well…let’s just call it Bronze. Don’t get me wrong. There are some great Indian, French, Spanish, Italian, Kurdish, and Greek restaurants in the UK and France. But only in America will you find all of the above plus New York and Chicago pizza, true southern (Memphis, North Carolina, and Texas) Barbeque, traditional Mexican, Latin American street food, hot wings, Maryland crab, and much, much more.
Last but not least, let’s talk about…Beer. The best pubs are most definitely in the UK. The best beer, the best cocktails, the best bartenders, and a healthy respect for the potential dangers of alcohol. France follows closely with fantastic wine at fantastic prices. Which means the US of A takes third…though I’ve had several people tell me they love American bourbon and American lager. So, you know. There’s that.

 
Now that we’ve established our similarities and differences, here are our personal recommendations for restaurants and pubs to check out when you can:

Manchester – Food => Trof, The Soup Kitchen, Pound Bakery, Market Street Vendors; Pubs => The Whiskey Jar, Guilty By Association

Sheffield – Food => The York, Pound Bakery, The Great Gatsby, Patiserrie Valerie, Kurdistan Restaurant, Arusuvai, Pizza Express; Pubs => The Green Room, Brew Dog

London – Food => Pizza Express, Patiserrie Valerie Vapiano; Pubs => Electric Social, Hand In Hand, Troubadour

Leeds – (hopefully this list will expand as we continue our stay in Leeds) Food => Pound Bakery; Pubs => Bierkeller

Until next time, mind the gap and keep to the left.


- Dustin

Who Eats Best? America vs France vs United Kingdom:

 

Food. We love it almost as much as we love music (sometimes even more). We love to cook and we love to eat. Whether trying new dishes and restaurants, or sticking to the classics that we know we enjoy, we will almost never turn down the opportunity to get on some grubbin’. With that said, we have compiled a short list of the similarities and differences between English, French, and American cuisine. 

*For an added treat, we have also put together a small catalogue of some of the best places to chow down in the cities that we’ve visited*

Many ingredients that Americans have grown to expect to find in their food (like hydrogenated oils, high fructose corn syrup, MSG, etc.) simply aren’t legal in the United Kingdom, France, and many other European nations. Instead they use natural or organic ingredients.  

American food manufacturers tend to put a lot of sugar in everything! Salad dressing, condiments, vitamins, and even bread! In Europe, sugar only goes into things that are meant to be sweet.

Most everyone that makes fries serves the thick cut variation and occasionally curly fries. In the states we have both of the above in addition to shoe string fries, waffle fries, home fries, thin-sliced fries, and standard fries. Fun fact: In the UK, french fries are called chips, and potato chips are called crisps

The British seem to be a little skimpy on their seasonings in restaurant dishes. They simply don’t add as much salt, pepper, or anything else for that matter.

English breakfast => Two fried eggs, toast, baked beans, bacon, sausage, whole sautéed mushrooms, and sliced sautéed tomatoes, served with tea or a latte; American breakfast => Scrambled eggs with cheese, hashbrowns, bacon, pancakes, buttered toast, served with coffee or orange juice; French breakfast => A croissant and espresso.

Speaking of bacon…American bacon is all pork belly and tends to be fattier than British bacon, which is the perfect blend of pork loin and pork belly.

British and French milk doesn’t need to be refrigerated until after being opened. Same with their eggs.

British and French varieties of butter and cheese are more creamy and flavorful than their American counterparts.

Americans have McDonalds, Burger King, White Castle, Chick Fil A, Wendy’s, etc…The British and French have Kebob shops and fried chicken joints. THEY. ARE. EVERYWHERE.

Try and find an American that doesn’t lather up their food in some kind of sauce. It’s in our nature. Turns out to be the same for the British. They just like different sauces. Brits love gravy, brown sauce (sort of like steak sauce, but not very good…), and Peri Peri sauce (credited to Portuguese explorers and made using the Bird’s Eye Chili which is native to South Africa). We love ranch and hot sauce. We both love ketchup, mayo, and mustard, though English mustard tends to have an after-burn reminiscent of horseradish or wasabi.

Portion size…Americans just eat too much food. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but it’s the truth. On the upside, we’ve all lost some weight!

America takes the gold in food variety and overall restaurant satisfaction. France (at least Paris) follows closely with silver, and England…well…let’s just call it Bronze. Don’t get me wrong. There are some great Indian, French, Spanish, Italian, Kurdish, and Greek restaurants in the UK and France. But only in America will you find all of the above plus New York and Chicago pizza, true southern (Memphis, North Carolina, and Texas) Barbeque, traditional Mexican, Latin American street food, hot wings, Maryland crab, and much, much more.

Last but not least, let’s talk about…Beer. The best pubs are most definitely in the UK. The best beer, the best cocktails, the best bartenders, and a healthy respect for the potential dangers of alcohol. France follows closely with fantastic wine at fantastic prices. Which means the US of A takes third…though I’ve had several people tell me they love American bourbon and American lager. So, you know. There’s that.

 

Now that we’ve established our similarities and differences, here are our personal recommendations for restaurants and pubs to check out when you can:

Manchester – Food => Trof, The Soup Kitchen, Pound Bakery, Market Street Vendors; Pubs => The Whiskey Jar, Guilty By Association

Sheffield – Food => The York, Pound Bakery, The Great Gatsby, Patiserrie Valerie, Kurdistan Restaurant, Arusuvai, Pizza Express; Pubs => The Green Room, Brew Dog

London – Food => Pizza Express, Patiserrie Valerie Vapiano; Pubs => Electric Social, Hand In Hand, Troubadour

Leeds – (hopefully this list will expand as we continue our stay in Leeds) Food => Pound Bakery; Pubs => Bierkeller

Until next time, mind the gap and keep to the left.

- Dustin

One day we had a show in Blackburn, England. After the show we had nothing to do, but wait for our train at 7:30 the next morning. So we decided to set up and jam with all the locals. What a fun night.

Last night we planned to do our first ever open mic in France so we decided to check out a place in the 20th district called Cultura Rapide. It was a tiny, but very hip spot on the corner. The bar manager told us that the open mic was temporarily postponed; however he offered to let us set up and play for a bit. A bit meaning well over an hour and a half which was more than enough time to win over the kind French people. By the end of the night we made friends with Max, Edgar, Cedric and company. I also ran into Andrew, a young guy from Australia who is on a journey of his own around Europe. 

Bottomline: Despite the language barrier, Music is and will always be universal. I HAVE to learn French one day.

Au Revoir!

-Parry

How I feel at the moment.-Parry

How I feel at the moment.

-Parry

(via thiswarinside-isallmyown)